Savory and Sweet Streetfood

Of course – one has to eat to live and as some people told me that they don’t really know what there is, I  I will put a little bit of easy-to-get and easy-to-eat together.

Here are some of the vegetarian options (have no clue about correct English phonetic spelling…)

 

Bae Bau Si

Steamed bread with red or yellow bean filling (little sweet), mostly transported in a big aluminum box on the back of a motorbike with a loudspeaker.

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Mon Baun

Steamed (white or black) rice pancake mostly served with salt, oil and crushed peanuts and sometimes in the sweet version with jaggery filling. Spotted them often in front of pagodas, steamer made from pottery ware or aluminum.

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Parati and Nan Pyar

Either savoury with a small portion of curry or beanpaste as a side or with sugar e.g. Most likely to find in Teashops or at their front. Parati is baked in some oil, Nan Pyar without.

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 Beijn Hmo

Sweet thick fluffy pancakes topped with white poppy seeds (don’t have a picture at hand but will add it later). Various places: markets, pagodas and along the street.

 

Always good: Fresh Coconut!

Also good: fresh coconuts are always somewhere around, they will ask you whether you want to drink or also to eat them.

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Do I miss something you would like to add? Please feel free to comment below!

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Savory and Sweet Streetfood

Home and Hospitality

At home everywhere. It’s a matter of course and feels it has two equally important parts. On the one hand there is no hesitation of entering other people’s homes, taking things or even biting off from your sandwich (it’s not that I wasn’t aware of this custom nonetheless it caught me off guard) without asking. And on the other hand as soon as you enter anywhere everyone is eager to make your stay as pleasant as imaginable. Food is served to uneatable amounts, your tiniest hesitation is registered and accompanied by worried questions if there is anything that can be done – and sometimes there is, e.g. I just don’t know how to eat it. So these visits are characterized by generous giving and taking on both sides.

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Tea and Rice Pancakes in Banana Leaf

Also it feels a little strange to eat alone, so I explain myself: I am not used to eating with an audience. So for me there is something I have to get used to before I can really enjoy this part of hospitality.

But I am very grateful for all the lovely people I meet and it definitely makes my work here much easier, I don’t feel as much as an introder as this is a usual habit. Although of course it cannot be denied that I do get some extra attention as a Foreigner.

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As a guest at U Wizas school huge portions are always waiting for me

The immense amounts and variety of drinks and dishes organized and served stay always the same, no matter how often I try so emphasize (and feel bad about it) I cannot eat that much.

After this ritual is completed, everyone is in their normal relaxed mode again and may also take some of the food that is left. This is the part of the visit that I enjoy the most.

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A Myanma Classic: Mohinga

Home and Hospitality

Food Culture at Mandalay’s Night Market

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Some impressions of Mandalay’s night market. The night starts as soon as it is dark – which is as early as 6 p.m. here. So the night market is perfect to buy fresh fruit and vegetables after the heat of the day.

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Several street stalls also offer a variety of freshly prepared dishes. One of my favorites is this version of Shan noodle soup served still sizzling from the heat in a ceramic pot.
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Food Culture at Mandalay’s Night Market